Racing Dreams and Family Saga’s

Merindah Park

by

Renee Dahlia

 

A brand new rural romance series about an emerging racehorse stud and the family desperately trying to make their racing dreams come true.

John Henry Bassett

‘Money lost, nothing lost. Courage lost, everything lost.’

My dad’s favourite quote. Maybe not one I should be listening to, given my gambling-addict dad sank our once-famous horse stud into a deep, deep hole. Five years I’ve been digging it out. Slowly. Carefully. And now … I am risking it all. Risking Merindah Park on a stallion. Tsuyoi Red, runner up in the Japan Derby last year.

Now is not the time to get distracted by a gorgeous, pragmatic veterinarian.

Toshiko Sato

I’m at a crossroads in my life. Though my father encouraged me to follow my dreams and become an expert veterinarian, he left our family’s horse farm, Tomikusa, to my younger brother. My family expects me to honour my father’s wishes and marry a neighbour-a perfectly nice man who I don’t feel any spark with at all. But my own ability to bet-successfully-on horse races has given me options.

This decision would be easier if I didn’t feel the wicked chemistry hovering between me and the handsome, broad-shouldered Australian that my brother has decreed I will travel with to Australia to look after an injured horse. I’m usually so good at calculating the odds. But how do I choose between losing my place in my family, and losing myself?

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Renée Dahlia is an unabashed romance reader who loves feisty women and strong, clever men. Her books reflect this, with a side-note of dark humour. Renée has a science degree in physics. When not distracted by the characters fighting for attention in her brain, she works in the horse racing industry doing data analysis and writing magazine articles. When she isn’t reading or writing, Renée wrangles a partner, four children, and volunteers on the local cricket club committee as well as for Romance Writers Australia.

Q.  What sentences in writing have changed your life?

That’s an incredibly esoteric question! There is a sentence in a Lisa Kleypas book (A Wallflower’s Christmas) that I credit with giving me the idea to attempt to write a romance novel. I’d written non-fiction for over a decade, when I read this. I complained one day that I’d read all the books in the house, and there was nothing new at the bookshop, and Matthew challenged me to try writing one of my own.

Q. What is the best opening sentence you have written?

I have a soft spot for the opening sentence in The Heart of a Bluestocking (http://books2read.com/u/3yD16v).

It perfectly sums up the heroine, Claire.

‘No,’ Claire said emphatically. ‘I don’t owe you my time.’ She lifted her chin a fraction and glared at her father. He stared back with those astute eyes.

Q.     Best closing scene, you have written?

I enjoyed writing the epilogue to the Merindah Park series – it gives the reader one last taste of all the characters, as well as a nod to the success of one of the horses whose stories are threaded through the series.

Where to buy your book
HERE
How would readers connect with You

Website

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The seductive truth about neighbours and Win!

 

Law & Disorder

by Liv Arnold

Lawyer Juliet Jackson has come head to head with Sergeant Jesse Burns on numerous occasions in court. He is provoking. Pigheaded. Punch-worthy. They don’t get along. Not one little bit. The unfortunate fact he’s also her next-door neighbour sends her loathing off the charts. But when Juliet’s caught locked outside her home in nothing but a skimpy towel, she must swallow her pride and turn to Jesse for help. She doesn’t expect the explosive chemistry between them and can’t help but wonder if Jesse’s as demanding in the bedroom as he is in the courtroom.

 

Law & Disorder by Liv Arnold

About Law & Disorder

I’ve watched the TV show Neighbours since I was a child. I used to come home from school, get changed, have a snack then sit down and watch. I love the community behind the storylines and the more light-hearted moments. So, I thought it would be a fun idea to have the heroine and hero as neighbours, but spice things up a little.

Liv Arnold AuthorAbout Liv

Liv Arnold has worked as a copywriter for several global companies and now runs her own freelance business. She grew up in Melbourne, Australia, and lives with her husband and their spoiled dog, who only eats freshly cooked meals. When she’s not writing, Liv’s avoiding the gym, devouring a cheese platter, or marathoning way too much TV. And of course, she’s a massive book addict and often reads until all hours of the night.

 

Q. What sentences in writing have changed your life?

That’s a hard one. There’re no sentences that spring to mind. I found The Kite Runner written so beautifully. So much so in another book I’m writing, The Kite Runner is the main character’s favourite book.

Q. Which book left you empty inside once you finished writing it?

Haven’t had that feeling so far. I’m so relieved when I finish my book and want to get stuck into the editing and my next book. I get distracted easily and work on multiple projects at once.

Q. What is the best opening sentence you have written?

I’m drafting a YA fantasy romance that moves at a fast pace. Every chapter ends on a cliff-hanger and I tried to build intrigue from the first sentence with: How to Tell the Difference Between a Regular Mirror and a Two-way Surveillance Mirror?

BookBaybZ John Jennings

Q. Have you ever read the ending of a book after only reading the first few chapters? If no, why, if yes…why?

I hardly ever do that because I like to read from start to finish. I read an erotica though called The Awakening of Sleeping Beauty. I usually don’t read erotica (must have a romance in the story for me), so I read the first few chapters and the end. Was curious if the main character escaped being a slave and if she got her HEA.

Q. What don’t you want to see in a well-written villain that happens frequently?

A villain that has no clear internal conflicts or motivation. There’s also so many clichés that comes with villains – they’re ugly, they wear dark colours, there’s nothing relatable about them. I love 3D characters where the reader might end up sympathising with the villain’s cause.

Unsplash

Q.Who is the best villain you have written to date?

In my next book, Etched in Stone, I’ve written a Constable character who’s a little bit of a villain. Well she causes a lot of trouble for the main characters anyway through blackmail, abuse of power and threats. She stops at nothing to achieve what she wants to get her justice, but she has strong motives.

Q.Best closing scene, you have written?

My closing scenes usually has a little bit of humour in them or a twist at the end. Hard to explain without giving the ending away. For example, my short story The Commander and the Beast which was in the finals for the Monash Short Story Competition: Read it Here

This story was my first that placed in a competition and it ends with a twist that hopefully people wouldn’t have seen coming.

Competition Time

BookBaybZ and Liv Arnold Author

To win a copy of Law & Disorder, please follow my page www.facebook.com/livarnoldauthor and message me telling me you’ve followed. Winner will be drawn on 31 March 2019.

 

 

Amazon Australia

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I would love to hear from you! Contact me on:

livarnold.com

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Thank You for taking the time to chat to us about your writing and your book.

 

 

Learn from the Best. Be like Kristine, and write great sex.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

It’s my current greatest claim to fame that I was once told by a very senior top-five publisher that I write great sex. I was SO CHUFFED because writing great sex is hard.

<snickersnort>

As much as I know you’re snorting with me right now. It’s true. Writing great sex is hard.

Some of us do it with the lights off, a candle burning, a glass of wine. Others do it in daylight, drinking coffee in a café or in a car, while waiting for the kids to get out of school. Some of us fight for every racy word while, for others, the words flow like your heroine’s love juice.

Writing great sexy time is essential for those of us (like me!) who write at the steamier end of the romance spectrum. Writing great sexy time is also crucial in those sweeter stories, even when you’re about to slam the door in your readers’ face. Your reader still has to be swept up in the arms of your hero and BELIEVE that your heroine is about to get it good (or vice versa, I’m equal opportunity sweeping).

So, the million-dollar question is – HOW, DAMN IT? HOW?

 

  1. Use your senses

Sex isn’t just about insert tab A into slot B.

And even if it were – there are multiple tab A’s and slot B’s to be had, and multiple positions in which tab A can be inserted into slot B. Google ‘Kama Sutra’ if you don’t believe me.

But, you don’t want to just focus on the mechanics. What does your main character hear, what does she see, what does he feel? What do they taste and touch? Diana Gabaldon (in her book ‘I Give You My Body’) talks about the Rule of Three. Focus on three of the five senses and you’re on your way to writing great sex.

 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash2. Get comfy with intimacy

Recently I came across the 12 Stages of Intimacy (which come from a study conducted by Desmond Morris, a behavioural scientist, on why marriages last or break). I’m certainly not the first romance writer to identify this framework as really useful for building sexual tension (Google it, there are plenty of articles out there like this one from Jenny Hansen) but if you’re not yet on board, I suggest you give them a look.

Photo by Scott Broome on Unsplash

 

Like teenagers in the back seat of a parent’s car, sometimes you’ll jump a stage, or combine a few. But, if you broadly follow this progression (whether fairly immediately, or stretched out over a story), you’ll do pretty well in the writing good sex stakes.

3.  Don’t be shy.

Birds do it. Bees do it. It’s even likely your parents did it at least once.

Photo by Antonino Visalli on Unsplash

Most of us were not a product of immaculate conception, I promise.

You need to loosen up to write great sex. And the words on the page don’t have to precisely reflect your experience.

Writing a great anal sex scene on the page – when it’s right for your characters – doesn’t scream to everyone that you’re engaging in anal sex every night.

Well, it might to some, but they’re idiots.

Writing fabulous BSDM doesn’t mean you’re a masochist (although, if you’re reading this you’re probably an author so… same same but different?!). Writing a terrific deepthroating doesn’t mean you’re Linda Lovelace.

The qualifier to that is you HAVE to do your research. Anal sex requires lube. BDSM should have a safe word. Cervixes should not be pounded (those who listen to the My Dad Wrote a Porno podcast will agree with me. That hurts). And all good contemporary sex requires the participants be safe (except in surprise baby stories, of course. There’s always an exception to every rule).

So, maybe that glass of wine tip isn’t such a bad one. Having lubrication when engaging in coitus is never a bad thing…

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

4.  Explore

The last thing I want to mention here is, to write great sex, don’t be afraid to explore. Not everyone likes the same things and every one of your characters will be different.

So, they’re going to like different things. Some will like it sweet, and others will like it spicy. Some will like it in bed, and others will want to swing from the rafters. Some will slam the door in your face, while others will invite you to watch.

Don’t be afraid of any of it because, believe me, if you’re uncomfortable writing it, we’re probably going to be uncomfortable reading it…

Photo by Mickael Gresset on Unsplash

And Google is your friend. It’s an unending Pandora’s Box of tips, tricks and things you may never have really needed to see! But, seriously, there are plenty of legitimate sites out there that can help you with the detail of those less mainstream sexual practices, and with alternatives positioning (I mean, you could do it missionary all the time, but who wants to do that…).

So, they’re my tips for writing great sex. What are your best tips? What’s the best sex you ever read?

 

Kristine Charles BookBaybZ Love Sabres

Winner of the Inaugural Romance Writers of Australia Spicy Bites sexy short story competition, and member of the Love Sabrists, Kristine loves telling sexy tales, exploring relationships between complex women and the strong men who love them, then working out just how much pain to inflict, or not inflict, before giving her characters their HEA (or, at least, their HFN). She’s also a non-practicing lawyer who now works in human resources, and writes and reads, to escape into other worlds where coffee (and red wine) is abundant, designer shoes and handbags are cheap, chocolate has no calories and men always put the toilet seat down.

Find her on

Twitter @wordsbykc,

Facebook Kristine Charles or

Instagram @wordsbykristinecharles

and drop by www.wordsbykristinecharles.com to check out some more of her words.

February 2019 sees the one-year anniversary of the Love Sabre Anthology!

Buy it at www.lovesabre.com

Love Sabres BookBaybZ