Spies, romance, and the oppertunity to chat with a hottie; What more could a reader ask for?

In today’s Chatting with Authors, Elizabeth Ellen Carter has invited us over to meet and chat with the hero of her new best seller – Live and let spy!

Adam Christopher Hardacre .

A man of athletic build, tanned and tall. The soft blond of his sun bleached hair do his eyes justice, as he aims a gorgeous hazel gaze, which could melt the knickers off of any warm blooded woman (or man😉 ) straight at me.

“Good afternoon Adam.”

I hold out a hand in greeting and am pleasantly surprised when he takes it and bows, touching his lips to my knuckles.

“Good afternoon, Michelle.”  His manner tells me he has little time for pomposity, nor does her proffer a smile easily.

We take our seats and I gather my thoughts. (Which is never easy in the company of such a beautiful hero.)

“So, Adam. I reckon our readers would love to know a little more about you. Would you like to tell me  about yourself?”

Adam leans back into his seat as he considers my question.

“I am the only son of a Cornish carpenter and woodworker. And as a carpenter, I was expected to work in the family business until fate stepped in with other ideas.”

I scribble down my notes before looking up and swallowing hard.

“Fate?” I ask.

“Let’s just say life has a way of shanghaiing one. Then drags us along that path whether we want it or not. The next step in my career was as a ship’s carpenter after which I was promoted to Bosun in the Royal Navy, but resigned my commission. I was then made an offer I could not refuse, and began work as a spy for a clandestine group only known as, The King’s Rogues.”

Interesting… I allow myself to take in the man seated before me. His sense of dress, his smooth voice and stoic nature.

If one were superficially bound by outward appearances, a person might see Adam as a rough, uncouth, unmannered sailor and nothing more. But if one were able to look past the class distinction and his informal education, a person will see in Adam Hardacre a man of rare quality and one who can be relied upon.

“What do you admire in people?”

Adam’s face takes on a serious look as the skin between his brows creases and he leans forward.

“I admire people with integrity. I make a point to treat people as they prefer to be treated. ‘A man’s word is his bond’ is very much a motto I live by. Everything in this world is either black or white, there is no grey.”

We continue to chat over some tea, and I soon realize that Adam Christopher Hardacre is a man optimistic by nature – but not unthinkingly so. He evaluates the hand he’s been given and works on making the best out of any given situation. He owns a tenacity, and ability to come up with solutions when faced with problems. He certainly knows himself very well; virtues and faults included.

“Do you have a secret?”

“No, but there are secrets being kept from me…”

 

 

Refused his rightful promotion, Adam Hardacre quits the Royal Navy in disgust and is quickly approached with an intriguing proposition to serve his country undercover.

His first assignment takes him home to Cornwall to expose traitors plotting a French invasion of England. There, he meets newly unemployed governess, Olivia Collins, who has stumbled upon a hidden secret from Adam’s past – his youthful summer love affair with the local squire’s daughter. It is a tragic history that brings Adam and Olivia closer than is wise.
However, with the attraction deepening to something more, neither realize that Olivia unwittingly holds the key to his mission.

As Adam infiltrates the plot, Olivia finds out the shocking truth behind his lost love’s death many years ago, and both their lives are in danger. But their growing relationship is clouded by suspicion. Who can and cannot be trusted – anyone or no one?

Or… even each other?

Where to get your copy:

US
Canada 
Australia
UK 

Want to connect with Ellen?

and

Join as a subscriber to her quartlerly magazine: Love’s Great Adventure !

 

 

 

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